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Guiting Power


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What it says, really. I think this is a good tune to sing and it fits the "Christ Triumphant" words very well, although there's something slightly odd about the short phrases in the refrain and that the refrain isn't really "marked off" from the verse. But why is it so unrewarding to play on the organ? As I'm following it with BWV 565 on Sunday I'm playing it in D, which seems easier, but I'm still left with that strange figure at the end of the first line - should that be played on the swell? - and the wide-ranging pedal part. I'm using the version in Common Praise. I'd be interested in any comments, particularly ones that disagree with me!

 

Michael

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Guest Psalm 78 v.67

I also find it easier to play in D rather than Eb - and it keeps the congregation off the top Eb! (I tend to play most Eb or E hymns in D for this reason)

 

I always play that "figure" you mention on the same manual; it doesn't seem to put the congregation off (and mine doesn't need much to put them off!) To make it clear, I always do a play-over in octaves up to that point of the tune.

 

I think that the chorus is "marked off" by the semibreve in the melody.

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What it says, really. I think this is a good tune to sing and it fits the "Christ Triumphant" words very well, although there's something slightly odd about the short phrases in the refrain and that the refrain isn't really "marked off" from the verse. But why is it so unrewarding to play on the organ? As I'm following it with BWV 565 on Sunday I'm playing it in D, which seems easier, but I'm still left with that strange figure at the end of the first line - should that be played on the swell? - and the wide-ranging pedal part. I'm using the version in Common Praise. I'd be interested in any comments, particularly ones that disagree with me!

 

Michael

I have to disagree, I find the tune one of the most rewarding of recent tunes to play. It's not easy to sing in harmony, but like Woodlands, who needs to as its such a good unison tune. I don't think you can succesfully play the first line as a playover. Adrian Lucas wrote an intro which I still use and a jolly good descant too if you fancy a change from the printed one.

 

I also think it works best in E flat as well.

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Guest Psalm 78 v.67
I don't think you can succesfully play the first line as a playover.

 

I also think it works best in E flat as well.

 

Regarding the 1st point - I agree, but for a congregation and no choir, I would rather compromise on this than have people saying they didn't know what was going on!

 

Regarding Eb - yes, that is how John Barnard conceived it, but in my experience congregations make heavy weather of a top Eb. As for playing, I just personally find it lies easier under the fingers in D.

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I have to disagree, I find the tune one of the most rewarding of recent tunes to play. It's not easy to sing in harmony, but like Woodlands, who needs to as its such a good unison tune. I don't think you can succesfully play the first line as a playover. Adrian Lucas wrote an intro which I still use and a jolly good descant too if you fancy a change from the printed one.

 

I also think it works best in E flat as well.

 

I met John Barnard a couple of years ago - he was speaking on hymn writing in general to an RSCM training day - and we were chatting about Guiting Power over lunch. He said that it's his hymn tune, therefore he abhors the idea of other people writing descants for it. Or such like. He was clearly, at the time, very proprietorial about it! Musically his points were quite interesting - he, apparently, struggled to think of a tune that was triumphant yet gentle enough for the Suffering Servant verse. The key to the whole thing, of course, being the rising 6ths...

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What was the playover that adrian lucas wrote?

 

Please use imagination here:

 

-semiquaver octave run up to B flat on solo reed for melody of chorus, rh plays rest of melody

-left hand plays chords on 2nd/4th beats of bar

-last line normal harmonisation

 

I feel my inadequate description doesn't do it justice!

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Last year I followed Guiting Power, the last hymn, with a Sortie Improvisée on said hymn tune. About half way through I stopped hearing Guiting Power thundering out in octaves on the pedal and started hearing "Bob the Builder"... Same opening phrase!

Another one to add to Eddie Marsh's Postman Pat/Te Deum.

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