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St Paul's


Martin Cooke
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Would there be any chance, Mr Mander, of a brief update on what's happening at St Paul's and the timeframe for the completion of the current project, please? Out here in the sticks we don't get to see these things for ouselves in the flesh, as it were, and it would be great to hear if, for example, the new console is in, and whether the old one has gone off for refurbishment and what else remians to be done. I have so enjoyed the wonderful commentary and photo updates we've had from Worcester, but I'm more interested in St Paul's! Is there going to be some sort of publication about it other than what might in the programmes at the opening recitals?

 

Martin.

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When I was there on June 21, I saw that a new console was situated near the entrance of the quire.

I just now read the latest newsletter concerning the restauration of the cathedral, which makes me believe this is a new permanent situation and the console is not going back to its previous position in a loft above the quire stalls.

 

link to the newsletter

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When I was there on June 21, I saw that a new console was situated near the entrance of the quire.

I just now read the latest newsletter concerning the restauration of the cathedral, which makes me believe this is a new permanent situation and the console is not going back to its previous position in a loft above the quire stalls.

 

link to the newsletter

 

 

The newsletter states " ....the opportunity is being taken to provide a new alternative console which will be positioned on the church floor."

 

So the original console remains; this being a new additional console I believe!

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but then the 'old' console is in (our out) for repair/restauration, because as far as I could see, the loft where it used to be was empty.

 

If the loft on the south side of the choir appeared empty, then the 1972 console has gone away to be refurbished. I am certain that there never was any question of the floor console replacing the one on the south side of the choir except whilst the extant console was being re-done. This was all explained somewhere, I think - don't remember where.

 

Martin.

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When I was there on June 21, I saw that a new console was situated near the entrance of the quire.

I just now read the latest newsletter concerning the restauration of the cathedral, which makes me believe this is a new permanent situation and the console is not going back to its previous position in a loft above the quire stalls

 

I believe there will be at least four positions in the Cathedral where the new mobile console can be positioned (there will be four plug-in points to enable this). No doubt one position will be somewhere beneath the Dome itself, for recital purposes.

 

An update to the refurbishment at St Paul's would be interesting: I think this has been requested before, without luck I'm afraid.

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Mr Mander, Sir? :)

 

Its a shame that we have been left in the dark about the progress of the St Paul's restoration given that Mander's provided updates re the RAH restoration. I can only think that St Paul's, as the client, have insisted on being the sole source of information on this topic.

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Guest Geoff McMahon

I do apologise for being a bit slow in reponding to responding to these requests for information.

 

The mobile console, which has now been in use for a while, is an additional console to cater for the changing liturgical requirements, specifically where the choir is brought out to a position under the dome. The original console is back in our works where it is being refurbished and provided with the same new digital transmission system the mobile console already has. We hope to have the original console back in about four weeks from now.

 

Slightly more controversially perhaps, the Dome Tubas and Chorus Reeds are being replaced with new pipes. The Chorus Reeds were remodelled Tuba pipes and sounded too much like Tubas and the Tubas themselves would not respond to a slight brightening which they really needed. The old pipes are being preserved so that if somebody in the future decides replacing them was a mistake, the change can easily be reversed. The new stops should be installed during the first half of August.

 

That leaves just the West section to be done, but before that can be started, decisions need to be made regarding what might be changed in that section. It will not be removed, but may get moved slightly.

 

John Pike Mander

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Guest Roffensis
I do apologise for being a bit slow in reponding to responding to these requests for information.

 

The mobile console, which has now been in use for a while, is an additional console to cater for the changing liturgical requirements, specifically where the choir is brought out to a position under the dome. The original console is back in our works where it is being refurbished and provided with the same new digital transmission system the mobile console already has. We hope to have the original console back in about four weeks from now.

 

Slightly more controversially perhaps, the Dome Tubas and Chorus Reeds are being replaced with new pipes. The Chorus Reeds were remodelled Tuba pipes and sounded too much like Tubas and the Tubas themselves would not respond to a slight brightening which they really needed. The old pipes are being preserved so that if somebody in the future decides replacing them was a mistake, the change can easily be reversed. The new stops should be installed during the first half of August.

 

That leaves just the West section to be done, but before that can be started, decisions need to be made regarding what might be changed in that section. It will not be removed, but may get moved slightly.

 

John Pike Mander

 

GROSS.

 

The Dome Tubas have impressed so many over the years, so what a good idea to mothball them. I mean one would, wouldn't one.

 

R

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GROSS.

 

The Dome Tubas have impressed so many over the years, so what a good idea to mothball them. I mean one would, wouldn't one.

 

R

R,

Whatever your view on this decision, I would respectfully suggest that sarcasm and rudeness is uncalled for. I would contend that having the courage and vision to make and implement a radical and controversial proposal, whilst also possessing the humility to accept that future generations may disagree with you, is a sign of great integrity.

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Guest Nigel ALLCOAT
R,

Whatever your view on this decision, I don't believe that such sarcasm and rudeness is called for.

 

I concur. This is surely the most remarkably difficult organ to restore/change/make/etc. It is heroic in more than one way. Still, in the right hands it can be one of the greatest organ sensations to be found anywhere on earth. To actually have the task of creating a homogeneous whole out of so many centuries of pipes, fads, fashions and knock-backs, it is an Albionic miracle that we have the know-how and the tenacity to create such a instrument. When trawling my bag of books to different instruments around the world, I can honestly say that I can give thanks that we have builders of integrity and of consummate workmanship in this county to meet such a challenge. Although not entirely my tasse de thé (too large for my liking - I'm a 2 manual 28 stop man myself), I should say that if such pipes need to be replaced for musical purposes - and at not an inconsiderable cost - there was a mighty huge reason for doing so. Let's wait to sit again beneath that stupendous space and await the refashioned tsunami from above.

 

All best wishes,

Nigel

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As the previous material has been carefully preserved, and that the work

is, also, fully reversible, even people as conservative as a sell-out-by-date

historian has not to make any comment.

The customer decides.

As an organ-builder you can:

 

1)- Say "yes", and dispose off the old pipes (for example in Stratford on Avon);

 

2)- Say "no" and leave someone else do 1), also not better;

 

3)- Say "yes" and we shall carefully keep the old pipes.

 

Which is the best way ?

 

Under such conditions I would listen to the new stops with pleasure.

 

Pierre

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Guest Nigel ALLCOAT
Surely Nigel, that should read,

'I'm a 3 manual, 33 stop man myself'

Cheers,

Paul.

:lol:

 

Oh no! Too large and too much choice. In fact my house organ will be just 2 stops coming in September. Small is exquisite. When I was a young lad I could grapple with a monster organ and dreamed of doing so. No longer.

For my taste these days, a table for two is far superior to a Sate Banquet! But now and again one accepts the occasional invite! :lol:

N

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Guest Roffensis
R,

Whatever your view on this decision, I would respectfully suggest that sarcasm and rudeness is uncalled for. I would contend that having the courage and vision to make and implement a radical and controversial proposal, whilst also possessing the humility to accept that future generations may disagree with you, is a sign of great integrity.

 

Absolutely.

 

R

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Oh no! Too large and too much choice. In fact my house organ will be just 2 stops coming in September. Small is exquisite. When I was a young lad I could grapple with a monster organ and dreamed of doing so. No longer.

For my taste these days, a table for two is far superior to a Sate Banquet! But now and again one accepts the occasional invite! :lol:

N

But surely even the most simple meal for two intimate diners should include a decent mélange? :lol:

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Guest Roffensis
Oh no! Too large and too much choice. In fact my house organ will be just 2 stops coming in September. Small is exquisite. When I was a young lad I could grapple with a monster organ and dreamed of doing so. No longer.

For my taste these days, a table for two is far superior to a Sate Banquet! But now and again one accepts the occasional invite! :lol:

N

 

 

I went from playing a rather complete 3 manual Fr. Willis to a very small Rushworth organ. It certainly was a case of less being more. It was a discipline . I had to tailor my repertoire to suit the organ, what it was capable of, rather than myself. Colour becomes very important, also phrasing. A small organ can offer very much.

 

I then took on a 3 manual Hill which has immense power, but I always endeavor to use it in a retrained and musical way.

 

With any very large organ, perhaps there comes a point when an organ ceases to be a musical instrument? I see no real worth in scattered pipes. For me, a balanced, economic and well thought out specification, where every stop counts, housed in a single case is so much better.

 

 

R

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I manage to get a huge variety out of this - 8 (unenc.)8,8,8,4,4, Oboe 8 (all TC and enclosed with a ratchet pedal) plus 2. and a 16' Pedal with odd spacing - my regular instrument. Ingenuity, imagination and an ability to concoct is required - just like simple food cooked well!

 

AJJ

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