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Here is an instrument that is superb in both sound and appearence! Largest baroque organ in Europe which dates from the second half of the 17th Century and can be played by 3 organists at the same time, apparently! Stunning casework too!

 

Wikipedia entry (Polish with rough English translation):

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=pl&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fpl.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FOrgany_w_Bazylice_Zwiastowania_Naj%25C5%259Bwi%25C4%2599tszej_Maryi_Panny_w_Le%25C5%25BCajsku&edit-text=

 

Picture:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/walaszek/14509703899

 

YouTube (Bach Toccata & Fugue in D-Minor):

 

Very nice! Enjoy!

 

Dave

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The disposition can be found here along with links to some more photos and sound clips. The organ is one of three in the building (hence the three organists at the same time) and all are as lavishly decorated as the main one.

Although he organ sounds fantastic, I can't but wonder what the 'Horribile' effect is?

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I am not sure if we had this one here already – search says we hadn’t.

 

 

I think this is heroic.

Apart from being excited from hearing Reger performed so beautifully, and not just considering the circumstances.

 

Best wishes

Friedrich

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I am surprised I get the first post on this thread of 2015.

 

I have just come across this piece but the uploader does not know what the piece is and nether do I. Any ideas on here?

 

 

Dave

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I am not sure if we had this one here already – search says we hadn’t.

 

 

I think this is heroic.

Apart from being excited from hearing Reger performed so beautifully, and not just considering the circumstances.

 

Best wishes

Friedrich

 

I'm afraid I don't know the answer to Dave's last post in this thread, but my eye was caught for the first time by this one. I can't see that any of us have commented on this, and yet it seems to my mind, at least, to be extraordinarily clever. If you follow the Youtube link to Andrew Dewar's other uploads you can see that he recorded various other pieces too whilst incapacitated. It is especially impressive when he starts to use the stick.

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Another YouTube clip that I found while listening to a recording of the Finnish national anthem was this one. It is played by the Finnish organist Kalevi Kiviniemi on the Cavaille-Coll organ of St. Ouen, Rouen. A very good rendition if you ask me.

 

Dave

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Evening all,

 

Just found this clip of the Waldsassen Basilica and it features an improvisation on the abbey organ. What piece is being improvised on and who, if known, wrote the improvisation? It is not a piece I recognise. The improvisation starts about 55 seconds in.

 

 

Cheers,

Dave

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Rather a lot of faffing about before he started, and a number of liberties taken with the notes, don't you think? (e.g. extra twiddles in the triplets in the second line of the toccata and transposition of pedal notes in the fugue).

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Rather a lot of faffing about before he started, and a number of liberties taken with the notes, don't you think? (e.g. extra twiddles in the triplets in the second line of the toccata and transposition of pedal notes in the fugue).

But since the piece is a transcription by someone or other of something or other by someone or other, does it matter very much?

 

Ian

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If it is, I guess not. Even if it isn't, probably not! I can certainly see the point of alternating octaves in the repeated pedal Ds, although not of putting in extra notes earlier on.

 

If I were playing in front of a crowd that size, I would avoid riffling through the pages to find the piece before getting on the stool and channel-hopping on the sequencer afterwards (I notice he flicks through the pistons after selecting the channel - I don't blame him: I don't trust those things either!). I would also have asked la fille aux cheveux de lin to tenez la gauche before starting to play rather than just afterwards.

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The condition of this audition was a bit specific and the presentation quite a mess....

La "fille aux cheveux de lin" is an organist and is very familiar with "la tourne"....

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An e-friend from across the pond recently reminded me of this old movie about Compton's in their pre-war heyday. It's quite well known, and some members will be familiar with it (Musing Muso certainly will). It's largely about theatre organs, as the sound track confirms should there be any doubt. However much of the material is common to the firm's 'classical' pipe organs as well.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50CkMZfUF3s

 

So if you have time to wallow in half an hour's worth of nostalgia, this might be for you.

 

(I have a vague feeling that someone else posted about this not so long ago, but if so, I can't find it. So forgive me if I'm repeating old news).

 

CEP

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The . . . version recorded in Spain. https://youtu.be/PDzL8q6vxFo

 

This reminds me of my first visit to the incredible Cathedral at Santiago de Compostela in Spain. Fortuitously, I arrived on 15 August (the Feast of the Assumption) and was thus able to witness the 53kg Botafumeiro being swung, dangerously it seemed, by more than a half-dozen burly men.

 

The full organ was being played, in what might be kindly described as 'Reminiscences of Bach's Toccata in D minor' !

 

The Almudena organ is by Grenzing, large, with two cases behind the player for the split Cadereta.

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This reminds me of my first visit to the incredible Cathedral at Santiago de Compostela in Spain. Fortuitously, I arrived on 15 August (the Feast of the Assumption) and was thus able to witness the 53kg Botafumeiro being swung, dangerously it seemed, by more than a half-dozen burly men.

 

The full organ was being played, in what might be kindly described as 'Reminiscences of Bach's Toccata in D minor' !

 

The Almudena organ is by Grenzing, large, with two cases behind the player for the split Cadereta.

 

I once played this instrument for a Mass (and for a visiting choir). I was pleasantly surprised; it was pretty well in tune and the reeds were quite sociable - they sounded as much like good Wm. Hill reeds, as anything else. Certainly nothing like our supposed 'Spanish' Trumpet here....

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Certainly nothing like our supposed 'Spanish' Trumpet here....

 

As, indeed, our late, departed member Pierre Lauwers was fond of reminding us (amongst other useful things).

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As, indeed, our late, departed member Pierre Lauwers was fond of reminding us (amongst other useful things).

 

Late, departed - as in no longer a member, or something more permanent, Vox?

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I was simply regretting that he no longer posts here, Monsieur. As far as I know he is still out there.

 

Ah, good. Indeed.

 

He does (or did) post on Organographia - in French and German - and I believe that he is a board administrator.

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For those interested in such things this is a good demonstration of tonal and other aspects of Schoenstein organs in the USA.

 

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Here is a rendition of one of my favourite pieces, Lefebure-Wely's "Sortie in E flat". The organ is the Klais in the Halgrimskirkja (Reykjavik, Iceland) but the instrument that Richard Lea is playing is the Willis of Liverpool Cathedral.

 

 

Dave

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