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Anyway, here are some more (Les Morts on the Späth, the rest on the Walcker).

  • Fantasie und Fuge über "Ad nos, ad salutarem undam"
     
     
  • Part 4

 

I'm particularly impressed with the “Ad nos”, played entirely without the help of assistants. Oh, and from memory, “of course”...

 

Part 4...? ... :o it was getting really interesting .... ;)

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Here is a great clip. It is the Te Deum by Jeanne Demessieux and is played by Maxime Patel on the 6-manual organ in the Basilica at Waldsassen, Germany. A grand-sounding organ here and now how Mr. patel manages to get his left hand up to the 6th manual during the piece.

 

 

I have made a separate post ion this organ as well elsewhere in the messageboard.

 

Dave

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Aaaaaaaagh!! indeed.

 

:rolleyes:

 

 

I thought it was reasonably good, actually! I've certainly had similar thoughts, and have once known my mobile' phone to bleep to let me know I'd received a text when I forgot to turn it off (this after the incumbent's instruction to the congregation at a wedding to ensure mobile 'phones were switched off).... *hangs head in shame*

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I thought it was reasonably good, actually! I've certainly had similar thoughts, and have once known my mobile' phone to bleep to let me know I'd received a text when I forgot to turn it off (this after the incumbent's instruction to the congregation at a wedding to ensure mobile 'phones were switched off).... *hangs head in shame*

 

Sometime ago I had an arrangement with the organist of a carol service in which I was singing. The organist's wife was about to give birth to their first child and he had a mobile phone propped up on the side of the console to warn him of the impending birth - tactfully set to 'vibrate' mode only of course. The arrangement was that if the phone went off I was to nip round and seemlessly continue from whatever point in the playing he had reached. All well and good for the Rutter and Willcocks bits but the voluntary was a decidedly 'hairy' Cochereau type Carillon de pcnd (now there's a good name for a piece) confection and there was no way I was going to even attempt to nip round seemlessly into that so I had packed my JSB 'In Dulci Jubilo' just in case! Mercifully the baby was born later in the festive season. Interesting also - the organist's wife was also the curate.

 

AJJ

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... but the voluntary was a decidedly 'hairy' Cochereau type Carillon de pcnd (now there's a good name for a piece) confection and there was no way I was going to even attempt to nip round seemlessly into that ...

 

AJJ

 

Huh?

 

Do you mean one of mine - or one of his? I do not think that I have ever met you, Alastair, so I assume that you mean the real pcnd!

 

:rolleyes:

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Huh?

 

Do you mean one of mine - or one of his? I do not think that I have ever met you, Alastair, so I assume that you mean the real pcnd!

 

B)

 

'Heard one of your improvisations a fair while ago at a church in the Bournemouth area - 'barn of a place with a strangely extended organ that once might have been by Compton. Fine improvisation - started quiet and ended in orbit practically. I think you possibly also demonstrated at the nearby church with a 'Choir to Pub' coupler - 'nicer organ as far as I can remember - 'forget what we heard there though.

 

AJJ

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'Heard one of your improvisations a fair while ago at a church in the Bournemouth area - 'barn of a place with a strangely extended organ that once might have been by Compton. Fine improvisation - started quiet and ended in orbit practically. I think you possibly also demonstrated at the nearby church with a 'Choir to Pub' coupler - 'nicer organ as far as I can remember - 'forget what we heard there though.

 

AJJ

 

 

Oh, thank you, Alastair.

 

I remember that the second church was Saint Aldhelm's, Branksome. I had drawn up the scheme for the rebuild in 1995, including the voicing of the new Pedal and G.O. reed chorus: French - mais oui....

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Indeed_

And as with the Dalstein & Haerpfer, at least there are foundation stops

and tierces in the Mixtures. Not that "wrong"....

 

Pierre

 

Not necessarily 'wrong', Pierre - just wearing. I longed for the clarity and purity of a chorus without tierce ranks in this recording. The depth supplied by the tierce I found to provide an unfortunate thickening of the sound, which made the effect heavy to my ears. I also found the constant reediness wearisome - if I want a reedy sound for a Bach prelude or fugue, reeds do it so much more musically.

 

Having said that, the performer appeared to employ a fairly hefty 8ft. reed from the outset of the fugue, with an equally weighty (and smooth) 16ft. reed on the pedals. I found the result a little disturbing. The following echo section was so quiet by comparison (but again with a tierce - or possibly a smooth krumhorn) that the result was almost bizarre. The final two pages or so saw a return to the heavy reed effect of the opening.

 

Whilst the playing appeared to be accurate and musical, I must confess that I find it difficult to appreciate the attraction of this type of sound for this work.

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I actually liked the prelude. I don't mind tierce mixtures at all so long as the counterpoint is still clear - and it was reasonably so here, despite the organ's 1905 vintage. If I'm honest, I would probably prefer quint mixtures and I have heard more appropriate tierce mixtures than these, but I would not call the sound oppressive, just intensely serious.

 

I have to agree with M'sieur about the fugue though. The reeds do seem to detract from the clarity, and the sudden contrast of tone in the episodes and consequent disruption of the musical argument just reinforces my prejudice against changing manuals during Bach's fugues.

 

Yes, this is Bach the serious, the grand, the musical colossus. I happen to like my Bach like that. Yesterday my wife spent ages trying to find a decent recording of the Brandenburgs to download for her iPod. We went through loads, becoming ever more irritated. Virtually all of them treat the pieces as helter-skelter, airy-fairy, tippy-toed dances. Often splendidly virtuosic, certainly, but superficial. But that's today's Bach for you. The Bach I grew up with was far more a far more solid (though far from tedious) character - the Bach of Nikolaus Harnoncourt - but even he was too fast for my father-in-law. I guess it's my age. We did find Harnoncourt's Brandenburgs, but sadly the re-mastered sound doesn't pass muster today and the tuning tended to be insecure - but there's a monumental vision lurking behind the glitches. Surprisingly (to me) Koopman's speeds were also very acceptable, but alas, his performances sounded as if they had been recorded in a well-carpeted box cupboard - or possibly Wimborne Minster. B)

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And, though, it is recognized today (click on "read more" with the fugue) the Link organ

in Giengen is firmly grounded in the baroque tradition, in this case the southern one.

It is actually more "baroque" than any neo-baroque organ.

 

Pierre

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Oh, thank you, Alastair.

 

I remember that the second church was Saint Aldhelm's, Branksome. I had drawn up the scheme for the rebuild in 1995, including the voicing of the new Pedal and G.O. reed chorus: French - mais oui....

 

That looks a dream of a double-decker; lucky organist!

 

http://npor.emma.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/Rsearch...ec_index=E00139

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