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A wonderful young musician and this organ was built for him by his Parish in Alsace. In fact there are two Aubertins in this place (one East and this at the West), and it was one of the deciding factors when the St John's College entourage visited to purchase from this builder when they heard them both in concert. It also prompted them to have twin organs too and Francis and his assistant from Saessolsheim gave a memorable concert last term in Oxford to demonstrate them together and singly.

Francis, with Bernard, actually installed my house organ last September. The off-shoot is that I never get out very much!

Best wishes,

N

 

 

P.S. The older and larger brother of the Saessolsheim organ (both played from behind) are remarkably similar in appearance and is in the grand church of SAINT-LOUIS, VICHY. It is a remarkable instrument, not least because it was the very first Aubertin I played when it was in the workshop in 1990 and I stayed up all night playing it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A quite interesting video: Bach on the Link organ of Giengen a/d Brenz (1907),

by Prof Bossert:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MT2_FWb-yK4...feature=related

 

This sound closer to a J. Wagner or a Trost organ than any "Bach-organ"

from the 20th century. In fact, this late-romantic -pneumatic- organ is

a developpment of the baroque tradition, and not at all a disclosure

from it.

This video demonstrates this for anyone having heard central german baroque organs.

 

Pierre

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A quite interesting video: Bach on the Link organ of Giengen a/d Brenz (1907),

by Prof Bossert:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MT2_FWb-yK4...feature=related

 

This sound closer to a J. Wagner or a Trost organ than any "Bach-organ"

from the 20th century. In fact, this late-romantic -pneumatic- organ is

a developpment of the baroque tradition, and not at all a disclosure

from it.

This video demonstrates this for anyone having heard central german baroque organs.

 

Pierre

 

I quite like this, Pierre. The speed seems to me to be appropriate and the sound suits the grandeur of the piece. Thank you for posting this.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's some nice church music from Holland.

 

This is the Grote Kerk in the Dutch city of Breda. The organ here was puit up, in its present state, by Flentrop in 1967 but contains a positive case by Hendrik Niehoff(1534) and pipes from the 16th & 17th Centuries (ie. since 1534) but much of the pipework is from the 1700s & 1800s. Wether pipes survive from Niehoff's organ I know not. Jaap Hillen was organist of the Grote Kerk for 59 years (1949 - 2008): doesn't that make his tenure longer than that of F.G Ormond (who, IIRC, did 1929 - 1970 at Truro Cathedral, UK)?

 

The church itself is stunning: it was restored between 1902 and 1968 (the nave took 18 years: 1938 - 1956!). Also I think the outside was cleaned a few years back: I remember how bright it was to look at last time I went there. A visit is well recommended but I found I had to pay a small fee to go in. Was OK with that though.

 

Anyway, some YouTube clips:

 

- Firstly, a Dutch news clip regarding a series of organ concerts in the church. Unfortunately all in Dutch apart from the organist who gets interviewed but fortunately, in contrast to the BBC, they put Dutch subtitles up instead of talking over her. There are pictures and you get some sound as well.

 

- Secondly, the Allegro movement of CM Widor's 6th Symphony, played by Matteo Imbruno.

 

- Thirdly, the choir of the Grote Kerk, Breda singing CV Stanford's Magnificat in B-flat. The church's organist now is Bert Mooiman but I do not know if he also has charge of the choir. Good singing IMO though.

 

If you fancy more of the organ then a simple search for Grote Kerk Breda orgel should be fine. There are two Heinz Wunderlich clips there as I speak.

 

Enjoy!

 

Dave

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The older and larger brother of the Saessolsheim organ (both played from behind) are remarkably similar in appearance and is in the grand church of SAINT-LOUIS, VICHY. It is a remarkable instrument, not least because it was the very first Aubertin I played when it was in the workshop in 1990 and I stayed up all night playing it.

 

'Can vouch for this - an amazing instrument - I had an hour plus on this a week or so ago - 'so much to learn about it - I only just scratched the surface - metaphorically speaking that is !!

 

A

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Played at a speed that would leave even Ton Koopman out of breath, but without any of Koopman's flair ...

 

ok, I will put my hands up, I did not hear it all the way through, due to download problems, it is very fast tho, lol, that will teach me to listen first before posting anything. The "other half" did say at the weekend, that I have a habit of "opening mouth, before engaging the brain :( do'nt know what she meant

peter

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Try this - not YouTube - but just a little spooky...............keep your eye on the swell pedal!

 

A

 

PS It took a bit of time to load here so be patient!

 

Thanks for this - how was it done? Any more where that one came from? Why was the swell box closed after the piece had finished???

 

Peter

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I just found this – Sebastian KB has been mentioned here before, this is another display of what he does.

 

Judgement about the organ in ongoing discussion, by the way, is between quirky and rightout hideous (sound as well as achitecture). But I think that's secondary to this stunning Dance of the Death.

 

Best,

Friedrich

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Dear Friedrich,

 

By the way -apologies for the off topic- I just read very interesting comments

from you about Willis on a german forum.

It might be very interesting if you could open a new thread about it here, starting

with those comments.

 

Best wishes,

 

Pierre

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The Trost organ of Grossengottern -I do not think this one was on the Web yet-

with Bach by G. Weinberger (BWV 566)

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOlXki61y-Q

 

This is true thuringian sounds, ladies and gentlemen!

 

Pierre

Thanks for this... very interesting and impressive. After I got over the shock of those unusual mixtures (is that a 3 1/5 in the treble?!) the next thing that struck me was the wind supply... it clearly needs careful management. It just about hangs together to give what is an undeniable sense of grandeur, reached by fairly original means of mixtures and a resonant pedal reed. Clearly, Trost was a very individual builder.

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The design of the Great organ (Hauptwerk) mixture is tipically thuringian,

and is nearly the same as in the Kohler organ of Suhl.

The 4/5' tierce rank repeats in 3 1/5', avoiding the 1 3/5' thus.

This one is in the Sesquialtera (here with only one rank, the tierce).

This means that if you do not draw that Sesquialtera, you have a divided clavier!

Should you find that strange, be sure of one thing: Bach played such "bizarre"

choruses, at home in his very area....

 

Here is the specifications of the Kohler Mixture in Suhl:

 

HPTW Mixtur 6r:

 

C 1'- 4/5'- 2/3'- 1/2'- 1/3'- 1/4'

 

c 2'- 1 1/3'- 1'- 4/5'- 2/3'- 1/2'

 

c' 4'- 3 1/5'- 2 2/3'- 2'- 1 1/3'- 1'

 

(Only two breaks, no 1 3/5', but there is a Sesquialtera 2r)

 

OW Mixtur 4r

 

C 1'- 2/3'- 1/2'- 1/4'

 

c 2'- 1 1/3'- 1'- 1/2'

 

c1 4'- 2 2/3'- 2'- 1'

 

tThe Trost organ has nearly the same design on the HPTW)

 

 

 

The 3 1/5' rank is quite common in central german baroque organs, in the HPTW mixture.

I found one in the Fux organ of Fürstenfeld, the Trosts all have them, the Casparini

organ of Vilnius has it...

Joachim Wagner is an exception, but this one was also influenced by the northern school

(Wagner had a tierce rank in his Scharf; 4/5' repeating in 1 3/5'. But he made no Sesquialtera).

 

Pierre

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