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I thought these clips might be worth sharing.

 

The first one was recorded in the Jarhunderthalle (Centennial Hall) in Breslau - now Wroclaw - in Poland. The organ was first installed in 1911 by Sauer. It had 5 manuals, 200 stops & 15,133 pipes but this was enlarged in 1937 to 5 manuals, 222 stops and 16,706 pipes. After WW2 the organ was broken up with the greater part now forming the 5 manual, 150-stop, 13,207-pipe organ in the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Wroclaw, Poland. Most of the organ sits on a balcony but the pipes of 25 stops are housed in the Sanctuary of the Cathedral. The original console survives with all 222 stop tabs intact despite only 150 of those tabs working. I do not know what happened to the remaining 22 stops and 1573 pipes: were they made / incorporated into another organ elsewhere. Anyone know?

 

The recording was made by Gerhard Zeggert on 09th January 1937 and is part of JS Bach's Tocata & Fuge in D-Minor.

 

Onto something a little older. The music here is good even if you can't understand much (if any) German. Here is the organ of St. Jacob the Ender, Ludingworth, Germany played by Wolfgang Zerer. Sounds like a very nice instrument, parts of which go back to Antonius Wilde (1598) and Arp Schnitger (1682).

 

Something which is, in parts, older is the organ of St. Nicholas, Altenbruch, Germany. The first organ, of which a small amount survives, was built in 1497 but this instrument has been enlarged by the likes of Mahn (1577), Fritsche (1647), Dropa (1698) & Klapmeyer (1727). Still sounds very nice. Commentary in German. No idea on the age of the case but it looks fairly old. 1600s anyone?

Video:

Original Website: http://www.orgelstiftung.com/

Rough English Translation: http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=e...stiftung.com%2F

 

Hope thiese are of interest,

 

Dave

Hi Dave

 

Thanks for these - utterly fascinating stuff! That building in Wroclaw/Breslau (should we re-name the hymn tune Breslau to Wroclaw I wonder?) is fascinating and extraordinary.

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Splendid indeed.

 

I bought the CDs of these services, on the advice of pcnd5584, and rarely get through the week without playing some of them. There is a wonderful improvisation at the end of Colin Mawby's "Alleluya" on the same disc as the Te Deum which rounds off a compilation CD I put together for the car. It does turn heads on the few occasions I have the car windows open...

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Splendid indeed.

 

I bought the CDs of these services, on the advice of pcnd5584, and rarely get through the week without playing some of them. There is a wonderful improvisation at the end of Colin Mawby's "Alleluya" on the same disc as the Te Deum which rounds off a compilation CD I put together for the car. It does turn heads on the few occasions I have the car windows open...

 

I have to have these CDs. What are they called and where can I find them? (I'm sure it's been on this board a few times already - if so apologies.)

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I have to have these CDs. What are they called and where can I find them? (I'm sure it's been on this board a few times already - if so apologies.)

 

 

Stephen,

 

Do a search on Amazon.co.uk for Grande Heures Liturgiques. This is one of the CDs that handsoff is referring to.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

EC

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Stephen,

 

It is also possible to buy them directly from Solstice. The link is below. I must recommend PC's last recording, the improvisations on The Gospel According to Matthew. They are so moving, especially bearing in mind that PC's own death was so close...

 

http://www.solstice-music.com/caddie/catalogue.php?

 

I found them to offer very quick delivery; more so than some UK-based companies.

 

P

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Stephen,

 

It is also possible to buy them directly from Solstice. The link is below. I must recommend PC's last recording, the improvisations on The Gospel According to Matthew. They are so moving, especially bearing in mind that PC's own was so close...

 

http://www.solstice-music.com/caddie/catalogue.php?

 

I found them to offer very quick delivery; more so than some UK-based companies.

 

P

 

Thanks, En Chamade, I've ordered the CD.

 

Thanks also, Handsoff or P (sorry, I don't actually know who anyone is - one or two exceptions) I will also look at the Solstice site. Bach at Notre-Dame?? What does it sound like? I have seen a youtube video of Vierne and I used to have an old LP of Cochereau playing the Toccata in C and, presumably, other things, but seem to remember that is was fairly grotesque. I remember now, there was Valet will ich.... in D - very slow.

 

Stephen

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Hi Dave

 

Thanks for these - utterly fascinating stuff! That building in Wroclaw/Breslau (should we re-name the hymn tune Breslau to Wroclaw I wonder?) is fascinating and extraordinary.

Didn't know there was a hymn tune called Breslau. The city of Wroclaw is one I have visited a few times because my older brother, his wife and my nephew live there. Heavily damaged in the war but so thoroughly restored that there isn't much evidence of the war having ever reached the city. Superb place to spend, at the very least, a weekend but you will certainly find - as I do: I can go there but I hate leaving - that a weekend is not enough.

 

Go if you get the chance. Superb city. I have some photos:

http://davespix.fotopic.net/c1529295.html

 

Dave

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at Liverpool in 1927! Wonderful poise, colour and virtuosity

 

Excellent ! thanks !

 

Pierre

 

Update 11 A.M.: a belgian organist on the french forum, where I placed this link, wrote:

 

"I wish I were 82 years older. I would have heard georgous things, and would have

*finished* today".

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Thanks, En Chamade, I've ordered the CD.

 

Thanks also, Handsoff or P (sorry, I don't actually know who anyone is - one or two exceptions) I will also look at the Solstice site. Bach at Notre-Dame?? What does it sound like? I have seen a youtube video of Vierne and I used to have an old LP of Cochereau playing the Toccata in C and, presumably, other things, but seem to remember that is was fairly grotesque. I remember now, there was Valet will ich.... in D - very slow.

 

Stephen

 

If the Bach at Nôtre-Dame CD is that with Philippe Léfébvre playing, I have it and I think that it is good. The CD was recorded before the organ was 'restored' (and, unfortunately, altered) so, although the sound is a little rough in places, the instrument still sounds superb as far as I am concerned. Personally I like the way Pierre Cochereau played Bach - I get rather bored with the 'I am going to use the Great chorus, one stop of each pitch, with the Pedal flue work up to Mixture; and I shall add the Pedal Fagotto to help provide definition' approach - particularly when two or three preludes and fugues are then played on this same registration, with little diference in treatment throughout.

 

There are many CDs of Cochereau's improvisations which are worth purchasing. Most are available through the Solstice site; however, there are a few others (for example, those on the Phillips label) which are also worth investigating. I would agree with handsoff - the improvisations on the Gospel According to Saint Matthew are incredible - moving and poignant, they show Cochereau as he had possibly never been heard before. Here there are no light scherzi or variations - here, for once, there is a darker side to these improvisations, illustrating with piercing clarity the flight into Egypt or the expulsion of the money changers from the temple, leading to the final chorale, with added brass, recorded some thirty-six hours before Cochereau himself stood before the presence of God.

 

Aware of his own impending death, I do not think that it is fanciful to say that he reached within himself and drew from the depths of his soul the best of which he was capable. It is difficult to put into words the effect these improvisations had on me when I first heard them.

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"If the Bach at Nôtre-Dame CD is that with Philippe Léfébvre playing, I have it and I think that it is good. The CD was recorded before the organ was 'restored' (and, unfortunately, altered) so, although the sound is a little rough in places, the instrument still sounds superb as far as I am concerned. Personally I like the way Pierre Cochereau played Bach - I get rather bored with the 'I am going to use the Great chorus, one stop of each pitch, with the Pedal flue work up to Mixture; and I shall add the Pedal Fagotto to help provide definition' approach - particularly when two or three preludes and fugues are then played on this same registration, with little diference in treatment throughout."

(Quote)

 

Yes, Pcnd,

 

And the next step is.....Liverpool Cathedral put in order, that is,

rebuild to its pre WW I design -with the Septième ranks-. Notre-Dame

concept brought 100 Miles further.

 

Pierre

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Yes, Pcnd,

 

And the next step is.....Liverpool Cathedral put in order, that is,

rebuild to its pre WW I design -with the Septième ranks-. Notre-Dame

concept brought 100 Miles further.

 

Pierre

 

On the other hand, this organ has existed without them for its entire life and, despite having received a number of restorations, none of the incumbent organists has so far been inclined to re-instate the original mixture or mutation scheme.

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On the other hand, this organ has existed without them for its entire life and, despite having received a number of restorations, none of the incumbent organists has so far been inclined to re-instate the original mixture or mutation scheme.

 

....Which is no proof that it was "wrong".

 

Pierre

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On the other hand, this organ has existed without them for its entire life and, despite having received a number of restorations, none of the incumbent organists has so far been inclined to re-instate the original mixture or mutation scheme.

Very true, and I adore the Liverpool sound (as long as Grand Chorus to Great is given a rest once in a while!), but there have been significant changes since it was built: e.g. suppression of the Pedal mutations, the u/e Choir division, and tierce in the pedal mixture

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....Which is no proof that it was "wrong".

 

Pierre

 

Granted - but neither does it exhibit a desire on the parts of the resident musicians to 'restore' these stops. Having said this, there is no particular reason why an instrument of this size could not have both types of compound stop; perhaps as an alternative to adding yet another big solo reed....

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Very true, and I adore the Liverpool sound (as long as Grand Chorus to Great is given a rest once in a while!), but there have been significant changes since it was built: e.g. suppression of the Pedal mutations, the u/e Choir division, and tierce in the pedal mixture

 

Indeed. Some of these changes are interesting, although the somewhat skeletonised Positif section of the Choir Organ just looks like a sandard 1960s Willis 'make-over' (without knocking through a wall, or installing something fashioned from perspex).

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